Curb Appeal Landscaping for Home Buyers & Sellers

curb appeal landscaping

Understanding curb appeal landscaping principles benefits you regardless of whether you’re looking to buy, sell, or spruce up a home. In the accompanying video, Earth Works Owner Jason Duffney provides examples of curb appeal landscaping principles used in developing a plan for a new homeowner in Jacksonville.

The landscape should fit the architecture. The color, form, texture, and scale of plants compared to the home affect curb appeal, as do their arrangement and maintenance. “So when doing landscapes for homes, the first thing I consider is the windows, columns, and walkways…,” Duffney said. “The windows are the eyes of the home. And whatever you do like in the makeup world, you are going to accent around those eyes.” If you decide to have hedges in front of the home, consider trimming them or utilizing a dwarf variety to avoid obstructing the view. Trees likewise should not obstruct windows unless the intent is for them to provide a privacy block. However, the privacy benefit of blocking the street view can become and pitfall if potential buyers can’t see the home. Duffney demonstrates how the sight of columns blocked by hedges is enhanced by removing those hedges and installing Blue Point Junipers.

“Design principles include unity, balance, transition, focalization, proportion, rhythm, repetition and simplicity,” according to Basic Principles of Landscape Design published by the University of Florida. “Landscaping combines elements of art and science to create a functional, aesthetically pleasing extension of indoor living to the outdoors.” These principles aren’t an exact science but a good guide for improving curb appeal in the eyes of the many.

“We always try to focus on having balance in the yard,” Duffney said. “A home like this, you can do things symmetrical. Certain homes you can’t, but you can always create balance.” Both symmetrical and asymmetrical types of balance help a landscape make sense. “Symmetrical balance is used in formal landscapes when one side of the landscape is a mirror image of the opposite side,” according to Principles of landscape published by Michigan State University. “These landscapes often use geometric patterns in the walkways, planting beds, and even how the plants are pruned into shapes. This type of balance appears to be rather stiff in appearance and often is highly maintained. Asymmetrical balance, also known as informal balance, differs from one side to the other and appears to be relaxing and free-flowing.”

As ongoing maintenance and upkeep are essential for curb appeal landscaping, consider replacing annual flower beds with various colored evergreen plants. “A lot of people get fixated on doing lots of flowers,” Duffney said. “For homeowners that don’t mind being in the garden a lot, that’s a great option, but you can actually create with lots of evergreen material a landscape that is very easy to sustain. You can do it with evergreens and not have so much work.” Annual beds and flowers during the off-season can leave an area of the landscape looking bare and unkempt. That’s problematic for home buyers and sellers potentially burdened with untimely upkeep. Duffney likewise demonstrates how to layer plants and use plant material to hide utilities along with a host of other considerations. You can do curb appeal landscaping projects yourself or reach out for assistance to a professional landscape design firm like Earth Works for a design consultation. We are here to help.

For comprehensive solutions to your specific lawn, garden, and landscaping needs, contact Earth Works of Jacksonville online and at 904-996-0712.
We proudly serve clients in Northeast Florida, including Jacksonville, Ponte Vedra Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Jacksonville Beach, Nocatee, St. Johns, Fleming Island, Orange Park, Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, Amelia Island, Fernandina, and St. Augustine.